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Final Fantasy XV by Square Enix

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$59.99

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$59.99

  • Available now
  • Downloads to U.S. addresses only
  • Download orders are not eligible for returns or credits
T
  • Language
  • Mild Blood
  • Partial Nudity
  • Violence
  • Platform: Xbox One
  • Publisher: Square Enix
  • Developer: Square Enix
  • Category: Role-Playing

Product Details:

Final Fantasy XV

Cruising To Success
by Andrew Reiner
Concept:

A wildly different take on the series that embraces free-form combat, open-world exploration, and vast amounts of time on the open road


Graphics:

Camera tracking is sometimes faulty, but the action is a sight to behold, offering nicely animated characters, huge enemies, and stunning weapon effects


Sound:

Some location-specific melodies (especially at truck stops) are shockingly bad, and fail to capture the essence of the world. The new orchestrated combat pieces fair better, and the long car rides are improved by the collection of old Final Fantasy tracks. Voice work is top notch


Playability:

Combat is a showpiece of twitch gameplay and RPG conventions. Each battle can be a blast and a true test of skill. Driving is abysmal to the point of being nearly unplayable


Entertainment:

Final Fantasy XV struggles mightily with open-world navigation, but succeeds in storytelling, combat, and in empowering the player. Even fishing is good fun


Replay:

Moderately High

Final Fantasy XV is a road trip that comes dangerously close to running out of gas, coasting on fumes long enough to deliver a rich and rewarding open-world experience that embraces the bond of friendship just as much as the thrill of hunting for rare treasure and beasts. The concept of hitting the open road in a convertible with three friends is largely successful, consisting of pit stops at roadside dinners, detours to lakes for a quiet evening of fishing, campfires under the stars, and expeditions through the wilderness to find a landmark for a group photo. Final Fantasy XV captures the atmosphere of cruising down an American interstate, but also the boredom that comes from staring down hundreds of miles of open road, or not having anything more to say to the people in the car. If you can tolerate a baffling amount of time where nothing but travel happens, Final Fantasy XV is a good game that upends series traditions and stands as a uniquely satisfying adventure.

Although much of the focus is on the road trip, this isn't a traditional coming-of-age story for the four young gentlemen in the car. Protagonist Prince Noctis is hitting the road to attend his wedding not by his own will, but the order of his father. Noctis is to wed Lady Lunafreya to bring two kingdoms together and end the threat of war.

The narrative sticks to basic beats and doesn't try to overwhelm the player with lore or branching threads, something Final Fantasy XIII struggled with. The story ends up being a fun and emotional ride. The camaraderie between Noctis and his pals is beautifully told, as is the turmoil plaguing the kingdom. Like a car rolling along the highway, the story doesn't dwell on particular moments for too long, and moves along at a fervent pace. Some big, emotional scenes are hurt by the push to move on, but the political jargon is kept to a minimum, and the focus is instead placed on developing the characters.

I was a big fan of Final Fantasy X's ensemble, but thanks to the smart (and often funny) dialogue, Final Fantasy XV's characters are my favorite in the series. Prompto is loud and full of bad jokes, but he is sweet at heart and easy to root for. Ignis is the father-like voice of reason. Gladiolus is quiet and reserved, but ends up being the perfect wingman. Noctis is a bit of a cipher (which deepens the disconnect in emotional moments), but is a great leader, and an interesting, conflicted character, torn between his duties to the kingdom and wanting a different life.

The characters are made stronger by their interests, which are brilliantly sewn into the story and gameplay. Prompto is a photographer, and he snaps as many photos as he can throughout the trip. Whenever the group of friends rests for the night, the player can view all of the images he's taken, and can even save them. Ignis' love of food is just as fun to follow. Whenever he sees someone eating a new dish, or discovers an ingredient, he has a "eureka" moment, and jots down a recipe, which can benefit the group with significant (albeit temporary) attribute bumps.

See more of the review at Game Informer

Story

In a matter of days, the Kingdom of Lucis is to sign an armistice, ending a long and bitter conflict with Niflheim. Ahead of the ceremony, Prince Noctis, heir to the Lucian throne, sets forth from his homeland to formalize the union of states through his marriage to the Lady Lunafreya of the imperial province of Tenebrae.

The offer of peace, however, is no more than a ruse to lower the Lucian shield, and the imperial army takes the crown city and its sacred crystal in one fell swoop. En route to his destination, Noctis is shocked to learn that he, his father the king, and his betrothed are believed dead.

Overnight, the dream of peace has faded into a distant memory. His world crumbling around him, Noctis has naught but his resolve and his loyal companions to see him through the trials to come.

Important Information:

If you are a fan of the Final Fantasy franchise, check out all the latest Final Fantasy XV games and accessories available for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.